TARNANTHI - Indigenous Art Spectacular

The 2017 Tarnanthi Festival in Adelaide is set to be the biggest celebration of contemporary art from Australia’s oldest living culture. Not to be missed.

TARNANTHI

/pronounced tar-nan-dee, is a Kaurna word from the traditional owners of the Adelaide Plains meaning to come forth or appear - like sun and the first emergence of light.

13-22 October 2017

Image: Betty Pumani - see captions below

In 2017, Tarnanthi will come forth with the largest celebration of art from Australia's oldest living culture, sheeding new light on contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art.

Venues across Adelaide will proudly display, exhibit, host and embrace elements of the festival over 10 days with the wildest range of indigenous art to be seen around the city and beyond.

Our top five include:

1. THE ART GALLERY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

The main presenter of Tarnanthi will be hosting an unmissible exhibition of the best of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists of many disciplines for an extended period from 13 October 2017 until 28 January 2018. 

More info

Image: APY Mens Collaborative - see captions below

 

2.  MIGRATION MUSEUM

Download the 'Bangaroo Ngangamay' app before you visit for an immersive festival experience

More info

 

3. PORT ADELAIDE

Head to the Black Diamond Laneway precinct on Saturday 21 October for Tarnanthi at the Port.  Starting with a traditional smoking ceremony, followed by a line up of outstanding First Nation artists working in visual arts, music, dance and storytelling.

More info

 

4. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM

Through painting, sculpture, film and other new media, the Ngurra exhibition uses contemporary art to explore the lives of Australia's Western Desert people, the Ngaanyatjarra, and their relationships to the ngurra, across space and time.

More info

 

5. HAHNDORF ACADEMY

Head to the German town of Hahndorf in the Adelaide Hills for the Tjukurpa Stories, celebrating the importance of storytelling in Aboriginal Communities. Stories tie people to land, to place and to their ancestors, providing a means to pass on knowledge of lore, culture, ancestry, land, totemic sites, hunting, gathering and flora and fauna.

More info

For more info and full program - Click Here

Image: Betty Pumani     

Betty Kuntiwa Pumani, Pitjantjatjara/ Yankunytjatjara people, South Australia, born 1963, Perentie Bore, South Australia, Antara, 2017, Mimili, South Australia, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Linen, 300.0 X 200.0 Cm; Courtesy the artist and Mimili Maku Arts, Photo: Saul Steed  

Image: Apy Mens Collaborative  

Alec Baker, Eric Kunmanara Barney, Taylor Wanyima Cooper, Pepai Jangala Carroll, Sammy Dodd, Ronnie Douglas, Stanley Douglas, Arnie Frank, David Frank, Witjiti George, Rupert Jack, Willy Kaika Burton, Brenton Ken, Freddy Ken, Ray Ken, Peter Mungkuri, Vincent Namatjira, David Pearson, Jimmy Pompey, Willy Muntjantji Martin, Mick Wikilyiri, Mumu Mike Williams, Anwar Young, Kulata Tjuta - A work for Kunmanara (Gordon) Ingkatji, 2016, Indulkana and Amata, South Australia, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Linen and Hand-Carved Wood; Acquisition Through Tarnanthi: Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Supported by Bhp 2017, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide. Courtesy The Artists, Ernabella Arts, Iwantja Arts, Kaltjiti Arts, Mimili Maku Arts, Tjala Arts, Photo: Saul Steed

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